Behind Bangladesh’s incredible economic growth

Behind Bangladesh’s incredible economic growth

Bangladesh has witnessed an incredible growth in its economy over the past few years, roaring ahead of India in many areas despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Kartikeya Bhatotia (Research Associate – LEAD at Krea University) takes a deep dive into this story, examining factors that have contributed to Bangladesh’s growth, and shares lessons that India can take from its neighbour. Read it here.

Examining the ill effects of arsenic contamination in drinking water

Examining the ill effects of arsenic contamination in drinking water

In this research brief, Sujatha Srinivasan (Research Fellow) and Geetanjali GK (Research Associate) from LEAD at Krea University share insights on the impact of increasing awareness about arsenic contamination in the adoption of healthier and safer water-use behaviours in Bihar. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods. Read it here.

Krea leadership at Chennai International Centre (CIC) panel discussion

Krea leadership at Chennai International Centre (CIC) panel discussion

The Chennai International Centre (CIC) organised a virtual panel discussion titled ‘India-US Gravity: What will pull the 2 nations together?’ featuring Indian and international luminaries from the world of finance, policy and education. R Seshasayee, Governing Council – Krea University, was a panellist and shared his insights on the Indian-American relations, drawing from his rich experience as a global leader and industry veteran. Dr Sunder Ramaswamy, Vice-Chancellor – Krea University, moderated this high-powered global dialogue.

‘Don’t wait for the weekend to escape and do what you love doing’: Mike Murali, Chief Fun Officer – Capgemini, at IFMR GSB annual fest

‘Don’t wait for the weekend to escape and do what you love doing’: Mike Murali, Chief Fun Officer – Capgemini, at IFMR GSB annual fest

The annual culture of bringing together business students of India continued this year at IFMR GSB. The School switched the spotlight on ‘Abhyudaya 2021’ — its annual fest, marked with signatory speakers and over 2,500 participants from Business Schools across the country including the many IIMS, XLRI – Xavier School of Management, Symbiosis Institute of Management (SIBM) Pune, MDI Gurgaon, NMIMS, Symbiosis Centre for Management and Human Resource Development (SCMHRD), Great Lakes Institute of Management, TA Pai Management Institute, et al.

The fest was inaugurated by Mike Murali, Chief Fun Officer and Director- Marketing at Capgemini. As a two-time TEDx speaker and Guinness Record Holder, in addition to being a regular stage and TV presenter, Mike Murali had a wealth of stories to share, peppered with his signature wit and words of encouragement for the students.

Relating to the fest’s theme for this year – ‘Escape Escapades’ – he spoke about how we don’t have to wait until we have stopped our professional journey to start doing what we love. He encouraged students to continue the spirit of curiosity and learning even after Business School. He walked them through the 10 commandments to live a happy life, and make way for ‘fun’ along with work.

In line with the theme, participants were encouraged to come up with solutions for unique puzzles, devise different strategic approaches and test their decision-making skills to crack the task of the hour. Divided into various rounds spread out in a number of activities, the event also included ‘Krea Talks’ featuring an excellent line-up of speakers from various career paths; a stand-up show by well-known comedian Sorabh Pant; and a short film screening with participants from other countries.

With a range of activities spread out in three days in two weeks, the annual fest ended with over 120 students winning various prizes and collectively walking away with cash prizes worth INR 2.5 lakhs.

Measuring women’s unpaid work: Understanding the challenges

Measuring women’s unpaid work: Understanding the challenges

While it is a welcome attempt to provide worth to housework, steps to reduce and redistribute such work are, perhaps, more important than asking for women’s unpaid work to be monetised, even notionally. They are important to ensure women’s rights and a sense of social justice. Soumya Kapoor Mehta (Head – IWWAGE) and Sona Mitra (Principal Economist – IWWAGE) look at the challenges to compensating women for their unpaid work. Read the article published by The Hindustan Times here.

Latest IWWAGE study explores female employment through public employment

Latest IWWAGE study explores female employment through public employment

IWWAGE’s recent study — ‘Generating Female Employment through Public Employment: A Scoping Paper’ — aims to estimate the impact of creating and regularising jobs for women within the system of public administration. The study also evaluates whether there is gender stereotyping in certain public sector jobs, and captures women’s perceptions of the benefits and constraints of being employed in such jobs. Read the report here.