A Union Budget full of hope and a transformative opportunity for India’s women & girls

A Union Budget full of hope and a transformative opportunity for India’s women & girls

In an article published by The Financial Express, Soumya Kapoor Mehta (Head – IWWAGE), Sona Mitra (Principal Economist – IWWAGE), and Kanika Jha Kingra (Senior Policy and Advocacy Manager – IWWAGE) write about women’s expectations from the Union Budget 2021-22 and how it presents an opportunity to ensure that India’s economic growth and development is inclusive. Read the article here.

Analysing the pandemic and the subsequent gender divide

Analysing the pandemic and the subsequent gender divide

Women and girls across the world have been disproportionately affected in the year of the pandemic, not in terms of the impact of the virus, but more so socially and economically. Kanika Jha Kingra from IWWAGE and Surbhi Singh from The Quantum Hub (TQH),  in an article published by The Indian Express, write about how India’s female workforce was largely invisible, underpaid, under-protected and constituted the largest segment of the informal workforce, which is among the worst-hit this year. Read the article here.

IWWAGE report captures pandemic’s impact on women and girls

IWWAGE report captures pandemic’s impact on women and girls

A recent report by Initiative for What Works to Advance Women and Girls in the Economy (IWWAGE) has revealed that while the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent lockdowns affected people from all walks of life, the impact was relatively harsher for women and girls in India. The report, “Women in Work: How India Fared in 2020”, jointly commissioned by The Quantum Hub, highlights the labour participation rate, both at the urban and rural level. Read the full report here and its detailed coverage by Mint Lounge here.

Women@Work series: How the pandemic affected women workers in the Indian capital

Women@Work series: How the pandemic affected women workers in the Indian capital

India’s labour force participation rate was 50.2% according to PLFS, 2018-19. The pandemic seems to have further pushed people out of work. In the latest edition of IWWAGE’s ‘Women@Work’ series, IndiaSpend examines the situation for women workers in Delhi – envisioned as a world-class city – where employment rates (and attitudes) have been nearly static since 1981. While women’s work participation has been long invisibilised, the pandemic hit Delhi’s informal workers hard and many women lost jobs. Read the full report here.

IWWAGE-IndiaSpend report: Gig jobs give women higher incomes but little security

IWWAGE-IndiaSpend report: Gig jobs give women higher incomes but little security

The pandemic affected a number of sectors, including the gig sector. Half of the gig workers lost their jobs and the other half had lost up to two-thirds of their income. From more than half of the gig workers earning more than Rs 25,000 per month in March, nearly 87% were earning less than Rs 15,000 in August 2020. Women workers reported being unable to work either because platforms had suspended their services or because they had to remain at home to take care of their families. IndiaSpend shares insights from gig workers and the challenges faced by them post lockdown. Read the report here.

Stories of resilience and leadership in the early months of the pandemic

Stories of resilience and leadership in the early months of the pandemic

According to data by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE), at least four in 10 women in India lost their jobs during the early months of the pandemic. This translates to an estimated 17 million women who were rendered jobless in March and April 2020 itself, in both the formal and informal sectors. In this article, Soumya Kapoor Mehta (Head – IWWAGE) narrates stories of resilience and leadership displayed by a number of women and what one can infer from the data regarding women employment today. Read the article here.

Strengthening socio-economic rights of women: IWWAGE examines SEWA’s approach in West Bengal & Jharkhand

Strengthening socio-economic rights of women: IWWAGE examines SEWA’s approach in West Bengal & Jharkhand

Women working in India’s informal sector face several vulnerabilities and are often denied decent working conditions and wages. Evidence shows that working poor in the informal economy, particularly women, need to organise themselves to overcome the structural disadvantages. SEWA’s programme in Jharkhand and West Bengal aims to increase the collective bargaining strength of the women informal workers, strengthen the workers’ movement, nurture and develop effective grassroots leadership; and also improve community’s access and understanding of basic services. The study, undertaken by IWWAGE in collaboration with SEWA, assesses the programme against these objectives with the aim to understand the impact of various components. Read the detailed report here.

How official data miss details on half of India’s citizens

How official data miss details on half of India’s citizens

Lack of sex-disaggregated data and other gender-related gaps in Indian government’s official data sources is making it difficult to track issues such as girls’ and women’s employment, asset ownership, health, sanitation and education. This results in a limited understanding of gender issues and poorly designed policies and programmes. As part of their Data Gaps series, IWWAGE’s second story examines which women-specific data points are not collated or made public, and how this makes women invisible and hinders progress towards gender-equality goals. Read the article here.